Odanah, N.W.T. 18 July 1880 Marcus Smith Letter to his wife
Odanah, N.W.T. 18 July 1880 Marcus Smith Letter to his wife
Odanah, N.W.T. 18 July 1880 Marcus Smith Letter to his wife

Odanah, N.W.T. 18 July 1880 Marcus Smith Letter to his wife
Lot 25 in our auction Saturday 11th September 2021
#marcussmith #odanah #nwthistory #canadianhistory #canadianrailways

Odanah N.W. Territories

July 18th. 1880

My dear Wife

                In passing through this place yesterday, I received your letter of the 18th June and am glad to learn you are so comfortably housed and hope you all will enjoy the season-

                I have just come from Murdoch’s camp near the western boundary of the Province of Manitoba where I have spent a fortnight assisting him in the location of the line for the 10 miles across the sand dunes of an ancient sea beach in which the rise from the Manitoba level to the upper prairie westward is about 300 feet – This has been a very difficult work- as the greater portion is densely wooded with swamps interspersed- so that the labour has been severe and the mosquito nuisance almost unbearable What were they made for?- However we have got through very successfully and I am now on my way to Fort Ellice, near which I expect to meet Mr. Lumsden’s party and spend some time with them but this will be on the prairie and I shall have no work to do but riding & walking- Where I have just come from I had to take the instrument in hand and do assistant’s work and teach those how to work who have been year in the service under Rowan and Hazlewood-

Leerchan and his party are gone northwest near Fort Pelly where they have 30 miles of woods to go through won’t they bless the mosquitos?-

I am very well and eat better than I have done for years but don’t sleep well.- We have had some hot weather but dry till within the last few days-when the weather has been more broken frequent thunder showers but not so heavy as in former years, I hear that Sir John Tupper and Col. Dennis are gone to England to try to get a syndicate to take up the construction of the C.P.R. from Red River westward

I expected something of the kind and cannot or dare not borrow any more at present- and the sale of the lands is never going to be rapid enough to build the railway- so that the Govt. are at their wits end- and it is death or victory to them according to their success or failure- I am tired writing without a support to the back so excuse no more () at present,

Love to all,

Yours ever

M. Smith